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Shall We Ban Internet Slang In News And Formal Documents

  • Posted on September 19, 2014 at 1:58 pm

In the modern society, internet has played a more and more important role in our daily life. Consequently, many internet slang terms such as PK hold gelivable become popular almost overnight. Some of them are even used frequently by some media such as in the newspapers, magazines. Some editors of the textbooks even employ them in the textbooks. Opinions of the employment of internet slang terms in media or formal documents vary from person to person. Some people assume that we should ban the use of internet slang terms in formal or official documents as they may mislead the young generation while others believe that it is not necessary to do this because it is an inevitable tendency to use the internet slangs. Supporters for the adoption of internet slang terms also account for such phenomenon because they think anything that exists is reasonable. However, for the healthy development of language usage, internet slang should be banned.
Firstly, repeated use of internet slang will mislead the youngsters. Nowadays, with the consummation of internet facilities, nearly everyone has an access to it. Among them, teens form a large group of netizens. Therefore, they may come across many internet slang terms. To their surprise, some terms are not in conformity with their original meanings. As a result, they are not sure which meaning to choose when they want to express their ideas.
Secondly, some internet slang terms have derogatory sense and are often used to scold people. Once teens learn such meanings, they will use them in their daily life and develop a bad habit in using language. Whats worse, they will consider use of these terms as fashionable and may follow the fashion blindly. It will do much harm to their healthy development both mentally and emotionally. Hence the internet slang terms should be banned.
Thirdly, although many items become popular overnight and to use them is even considered as a fashion, fashion will pass by soon. Only those words that can undergo the selection of people as well as test from time can be accumulated into the literature reservoir. In this sense, it is far from enough for us to adopt the slang terms because they have not been tested by the time.
In a word, although the internet slang terms are popular and expressive for a period of time, we still need to think twice before we allow them to enter into the linguistic family.

Do Certain Vitamin Supplements Help Vision Science Fair Project

  • Posted on September 19, 2014 at 4:24 am

When developing a science fair project it can be helpful to simply test common assumptions or claims about the cause and effect relationships between common products and our health. For example, do vitamin supplements help you to lose weight, grow longer hair or can they help your vision? Each of these questions and claims can be used for a separate science fair project. This sample science fair project is going to examine the effect that certain vitamin supplements have on your vision.

Hypothesis

The hypothesis for this science fair project is that vitamin supplements do not improve your vision. This hypothesis requires a little clarification. For the purposes of this project an improvement in vision will be defined as an increase is visual acuity as measured by a standard chart vision test. The dependent variable for this hypothesis is the visual acuity of the person and the independent variable is the type of vitamin supplement used by the test subject.

Supplies

To complete this science fair project students will need an eye exam chart, a tape measure, Vitamin C supplements, Vitamin E supplements, Vitamin A supplements and a placebo (sugar pill). The students will also need two to four test subjects for each of four test groups.

The Experiment

The control experiment group for this science fair project will be given a placebo. However, they will first be given a basic eye exam using an eye exam chart that is place ten to fifteen feet away from the test subject. The eye exam will be given for both eyes at the same time. After the eye exam is given the test subjects will be given a placebo supplement that they will take once a day for a month. At the end of the experiment another eye exam will be give.

There will be three test experiment groups. Group A will be given Vitamin A supplements, Group B will be given Vitamin C supplements and Group C will be given Vitamin E supplements. Again each test group will be given an initial eye exam. They will then take their supplements for a month. At the end of the experiment they will each receive another eye exam.

Data Collection and Analysis

The data that will be collected will be the eye exam results. These results will be measured in visual acuity ratios such as 20/15, 20/20 and 20/25. The analysis of the data will involve a simple comparison of the initial and post experiment eye exam results. If an improvement in vision is observed then the test subject will be given a score of 1, if they do not show an improvement then they will be given a score of 0. Each test group will have their scores averaged. The average scores will then be compared to the placebo group to see if the vitamins are helping and to determine which vitamin is helping the most.